Volunteers ensure WCA craft fair’s success

More than 30 volunteers ensured that the WCA’s annual Holiday Craft Fair held Saturday, Dec. 2 was a terrific success. Without volunteers’ able assistance, it would be impossible to organize and present this event.

We extend special thanks to Kathy Neuberger, chairperson of the craft fair, for her tireless work and to Rachel Seamans for organizing and staffing Rachel’s Café.

Gail Parenteau and the staff at Andover Elementary-Middle School were helpful and accommodating prior to and during the craft fair.

Volunteers, including students from Kearsarge Regional High School, were: Libby Angus, Leslie Angus, Pete Angus, Janet Baker, Deb Beerman, Lisah Carpenter, Kathy Davidson, Ann Davis, Marc Davis, Darlene Delano, Meg Dugan, Rhonda Gauthier, Adam Glass, Brenda Holland, Elizabeth Howard, Chris Jenssen, Kennedy Geary, Mary Kulacz, Brian Kulacz, Alexis McConnell, Sandy Messer, Margaret Monto, John Monto, Ashley Neuberger, Howard Neuberger, Meagan Norris, Susan Nye, Sandy Rock, Clifford Rock, Keith Seamans, De Segerson, Kimberly Slover, Todd Slover and Barbara Wiggin.

Our sincere thanks to one and all!

Nancy Large, president
WCA Board of Directors

Scarecrows are popping up all over!

The first entries in the Scarecrow contest have come in! 
(And there are more out there – so send in your photos!)

Thank you Lindy Heim!
Thank you Carol McDonald!
Thank you Rachel and Keith Seamans!

We love them all and are looking forward to lots more fun and festive scarecrows! Join the fun and build a fun, fanciful, sporty, scary, beautiful … or silly scarecrow(s).The Wilmot Garden Club cosponsors the contest and
the deadline for entries is noon on Wednesday, October 25.

Lots of prizes will be awarded so don’t miss out.

Click to learn all you need to know to participate!

Tick Talk at the WCA Red Barn

The WCA and the Wilmot Conservation Commission are joining forces to host an illustrated talk about ticks and Lyme Disease. At 7 p.m. Thursday, October 12, Alan Eaton, Ph.D., an entomologist with UNH Cooperative Extension, will discuss tick biology, the diseases they spread to humans and how people can minimize the chances of becoming a victim.

“My tick work began in about 1989,” Eaton said. “It was clear that tick problems were increasing here, and we had no publications to answer questions. So I started monitoring, writing and giving presentations.”

The free program is part of the WCA’s Chief David White Memorial Safety and Wellness Series.The WCA is delighted to co-sponsor this and future events with the Wilmot Conservation Commission. The commission supports educational programs to identify health hazards found in nature.

The WCA will host a Narcan® training

The WCA and the Greater Sullivan County Public Health Network will host an illustrated talk and training session about Narcan® (also known to as Naloxone). The program will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, September 28 at the Red Barn, 64 Village Road in Wilmot.

Speakers will include Pamela Drewniak, EMS and Emergency Prep coordinator at New London Hospital, Kirsten Vigneault, director, Community Health and Emergency Preparedness at the Greater Sullivan County Public Health Network and Tim Monahan, director of EMS and New London Ambulance Service. Representatives from the Wilmot Volunteer Fire Department and the Wilmot Police Department will also be in attendance and available to provide additional information.

The program will cover information about how Naloxone works, training on how to administer the product and time for questions from the audience. At this time, Narcan® is the only FDA-approved nasal spray that is an antidote for known or suspected opioid drug overdoses.

At the conclusion of the illustrated talk and training sessions, attendees will have the opportunity to practice administration as well as receive a free kit, which includes two doses of Narcan®. “Following the 439 people in New Hampshire who died from a drug overdose in 2015, the NH Department of Health and Human Services purchased Naloxone kits for distribution,” Vigneault said. “The nasal spray is very easy to use and the training only takes about 20 minutes.”

R.P. Hale in Concert

A small but enthusiastic group gathered at the WCA Red Barn on Saturday evening, September 16 for a harpsicord and hammered dulcimer concert. Dressed in period costume, R.P. Hale was the man behind the keys and mallets. Along with playing pieces by Sir William Herschel, Thomas Jefferson, and more, R.P. took a few minutes before each piece to discuss the piece as well as his instruments.  

A multi-generational and interdisciplinary artist-craftsman, R.P. has been teaching a variety of topics and skills since 1976.He is a concert harpsichordist and hammer dulcimer player as well as a harpsichord/dulcimer maker, master calligrapher and illustrator, pen-and-ink artist, nationally-known wood-engraver, Intaglio and Letterpress printer, wood carver, maker of marbleized papers and fabrics, period re-enactor, linguist, solar and archaeo-astronomer, and historian.

In 1999, the Smithsonian Institute recognized R.P. as one of the top musical instrument makers in the U.S. and exhibited his work. His concerts reflect his wide-ranging musical interests from c.750 B.C. works from China to that of Sir William Herschel of the 1790s.

Born to a Sonoran Mexican family of artists and printers, his programs “La História Cultural de México,” “El Calendro Azteca,” and “Astronomy, Math. Calendars, and Histories of the Maya,” respectively feature the history of Mexico as seen through the arts and traditional lore. R.P. received a Fellowship from the State Arts Council and in 2000 was invited to present his multi-faceted traditions at the Celebrate New Hampshire festival.

Along with his solo performances, he is in heavy demand by ensembles for his improvised accompaniment skills at the harpsichord and organ.

R.P. teaches at St. Paul’s School and is Senior Educator at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, specializing in spectroscopy, star evolution, mathematics, physics, astronomy history and archaeoastronomy. He has built a spectroscopy/optics teaching lab there. He taught summers at the Augusta Heritage Center in Elkins, West Virginia for 33 years and is a visiting faculty in art and astronomy at Davis and Elkins College.

Give the gift of life

The WCA wants your blood! The need for blood is especially great during the summer. The Red Cross is urging everyone to donate blood or platelets to overcome the summer shortage. This life saving work is only possible with your help.

The WCA will host a Red Cross Blood Drive on Friday, August 25. The blood drive takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the WCA’s Red Barn at 64 Village Road in Wilmot. To save time, you can preregister online. Whether you give blood or power red, all donors will receive a $5 Target e-Gift Card.

Can’t donate? You can still help by donating snacks or volunteering to staff the check-in desk and canteen. Email Nancy Large if you would like to help.

For more information on the blood drive and many other programs, check the WCA events page or stay up to date with WCA activities on Facebook.

Download or print the poster

Shop ’til you drop at the WCA Barn sale

Shop ’til you drop!
The WCA is having a red hot barn sale … at the Red Barn of course! The bargain hunting begins at 8 a.m. and goes on until noon on Saturday, August 19. It’s part of Wilmot’s Townwide Yard Sale.

By the way – if you have gently used treasures you no longer want …
Donate them to the WCA! We’re happy to add them to our collection of terrific sale items. No electronic equipment or clothing, please.

We are happy to provide you with a receipt for your donations. Drop anything off between 9 a.m. and noon Monday through Wednesday until August 16 or by appointment.

Call the WCA if you have questions – (603) 526-7934.

Download or print the poster

Thanks a million! Artists and volunteers ensure success of Imagination into Art

An enthusiastic crowd of art lovers filled the WCA’s Red Barn on June 23 and 24. Now in its fifth year, Imagination into Art has much to offer – a welcoming community event, a fabulous reception, art show, silent auction and sale. A wonderful addition was made this year with workshops for children on Saturday morning.

Imagination into Art combines a community gathering with art education. We appreciate the artists who came to show and share their work and artistic vision with the community. Jay Aubertin, Sue Finney, Vlad Chertikhin, Paul Linehan, Holly Noyes, Nancy Schlosser, Leslie Tuttle from Wilmot shared works in a variety of media. Additional artists from surrounding towns included Penny Koberger, Corbett Leith, Molly Leith, Lynne Raleigh, Julia DeGiovanni, and Grace Schust.

We could not have done it without the tireless help of many volunteers. The success of the Friday night reception was due in large part to some of the region’s best cooks. Our thanks go out to Margaret Monto, Bonnie Betters-Reed, Wendy Gouirand, and Leslie Tuttle for their delicious hors d’oeuvres. In addition, Judy Hauck and Gary Reed donated some fabulous wines. Patty McGoldrick and Ellie Gregor completed the tireless kitchen crew.

Kudos to Marion Allen, Diane Beaudoin, Mary Fanelli, Judy Hauck, Lindy Heim, Chris Jenson, Nancy Large, Patty McClintock, and Barbara Wiggin for lending their vast talents before and during the event. The hands-on support from Tom Schamburg, Jeff Gill, Bill Doody, and Gary Reed who helped with set-up and clean-up was most appreciated. Music made the Friday evening reception even more enjoyable.
Thank you to John Schlosser who played guitar and sang an upbeat selection of music.

Thanks to the beautiful pieces donated by Marc Beerman, Vlad Chertikhin, Judy Hauck, Lynne Raleigh and Nancy Schlosser the silent auction was a great success.

Finally, we thank the community and their continued support of the WCA’s many and varied programs and events. You all made it such fun!

Sincerely,

Nancy Schlosser, coordinator, Imagination into Art

Meet the Artists at Imagination into Art – June 23 and 24

More than a dozen local artists will participate in the WCA fifth annual Imagination into Art on June 23 and 24 at the WCA’s Red Barn, 64 Village Road in Wilmot.

Stop by and meet the artists!

Dana Dakin and Barbara Faughnan

Paintings and watercolors:
Sue Finney
Penny Koberger
Molly and Corbett Leith
Holly Noyes
Grace Schust
Leslie Ward

Ink drawings:
Paul Linehan

Sculpture:
Ann Feeley Kieffer

Joan_Pirozzoli, Nancy Schlosser and Lindy Heim

Photography:
Vlad Chertikhin
Leslie Tuttle

Fabric artists:
Lynne Raleigh
Nancy Schlosser

Handcrafted Furniture:
Jay Aubertin

The art exhibit and sale will open with a reception from 4:30 to 7 p.m. on Friday, June 23. Wine and hors d’oeuvres will be served and a $15 donation per person is suggested.

Judy Hauck and Dick Chase

Imagination into Art will continue from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, June 24. Families are encouraged to participate on Saturday morning and there will be workshops for children.

Some artists have donated works for a silent auction to benefit the WCA. Bidding will begin on Friday evening and end at noon on Saturday.

Meet the artists at Imagination into Art – June 23 and 24

More than a dozen local artists will participate in the WCA’s fifth annual Imagination into Art at the WCA’s Red Barn. Imagination into Art offers a unique opportunity to meet and speak with local artists. The two day show starts with a wine and hors d’oeuvre reception from 4:30 to 7 p.m. on Friday, June 23. A $15 donation is suggested.

Art lovers are encouraged to bring their children and grandchildren on Saturday. Admission is free and their will be workshops for the kids.

A preview of a few of the artists …

Leslie Tuttle, photographer
For many years, Leslie Tuttle worked as a photojournalist in developing countries. From nomadic tribes in the mountains of Turkey to waste pickers in Brazil, her portfolio focused on working women. The difficult lives of these women rid her of any romanticized notion of rural life. Leslie has an enormous respect for people who work incredibly hard to sustain themselves and their families, and for whom being picturesque holds no coin.

Collaborating with author, Helen Brody, Leslie recently turned her attention to rural development in New Hampshire. Together, they have investigated women farmers. Their book, New Hampshire Women Farmers: Pioneers of the Local Food Movement, was published in 2015.

During the process, Leslie discovered that the similarities far outweighed the differences between the women she encountered in other countries and those in the book. She is delighted to be able to share these New Hampshire farmers’ stories of innovation and resilience.

Paul Linehan, pen and ink drawing
Paul Linehan and his wife Ann moved to New London in the late 1960’s. Many locals know Paul from his many years as an administrator in the Kearsarge Regional School District. After almost 30 years in education and the good fortune to meet a multitude of very special young people, Paul took on a new career and opened Colby-Linehan Real Estate.

Paul always loved drawing and painting but rarely had the time. Throughout his years in real estate, he enjoyed giving his clients pen and ink drawings of their homes. After retiring in 2014, he spends most of his days reading, playing golf, traveling, working in his gardens, drawing and paintings. His work focuses on local scenes.

Penny Koburger, drawing and oil painting
Penny Koburger likes to paint and draw a variety of everyday subject matter. Watercolor and oils are her preferred mediums. Painting allows her to slow down and contemplate the subject matter, be it a person, object or scene in nature. She is fascinated by light color and mood. Rather than strive for total realism, Penny attempts to create an emotional connection.

Penny lives Enfield. She has a doctorate in clinical psychology and practiced for many years in Vermont. Since retiring, she has been studying, painting and teaching full time. Penny has shown her work in Vermont and New York. She has won numerous prizes for her oils and watercolors, including 3 Best in Shows. She has been president of the Bethlehem Art Association in NY, and is a member of Center for the Arts in New London and the AVA Gallery in Lebanon.

Jay Aubertin, metal craftsman
Guided by an artistic sensibility, Jay Aubertin employs traditional and modern techniques to fabricate both practical and purely ornamental pieces. Jay’s work celebrates the innate beauty of the materials used and a perennial reverence for quality. He creates custom products his clients are proud to hand down from one generation to the next.

He has a strong background in welding and fabrication. Jay enjoys utilizing other materials such as wood, copper and leather into his work. In addition to his many other projects, Jay has a passion for making and riding his own hand built bicycles. Jay lives in Wilmot.

Additional artists participating in Imagination into Art include

Vlad Chertikhin
Sue Finney
Ann Feeley Kieffer
Corbett Leith
Molly Leith
Holly Noyes
Lynne Raleigh
Nancy Schlosser
Grace Schust
Leslie Ward